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GREAT BRITAIN SAILGP TEAM BREAKS F50 SPEED RECORD ON BEN AINSLIE’S RETURN IN DENMARK

GREAT BRITAIN SAILGP TEAM BREAKS F50 SPEED RECORD ON BEN AINSLIE'S RETURN IN DENMARK

GREAT BRITAIN SAILGP TEAM BREAKS F50 SPEED RECORD ON BEN AINSLIE’S RETURN IN DENMARK

AARHUS, DENMARK – 18 August, 2021 – Great Britain SailGP Team CEO and driver Sir Ben Ainslie returned to the wheel of the British F50 today as the team began training ahead of the ROCKWOOL Denmark Sail Grand Prix in Aarhus (August 20-21).

It was an eventful return to action for Ainslie, who had missed the previous two SailGP events to welcome the arrival of his baby son Fox, as he and the British crew broke the SailGP speed record with a top speed of 98.3 km/h (61.1mph/53.1 knots) in strong breeze on the Aarhus waters – WATCH HERE

After winning the opening event of the season in Bermuda, Ainslie has returned to the Great Britain SailGP Team with the team in a strong position, second on the overall Championship leaderboard level on points with the leaders – Tom Slingsby’s Australia SailGP Team. On returning to the team, Ainslie was full of praise for fellow Olympic gold medallist Paul Goodison who temporarily led the team in his absence in Taranto and Plymouth.

Ainslie said: “The team has done brilliantly over the past two events. It was great to see Paul come into the team and with very little time to practice beforehand get straight into the thick of it. They battled hard, and it was great to see their fighting spirit come through and finish on a really positive note with a race win in our home event in Plymouth.

“Now, coming into Aarhus we’ve got to regroup quickly. It was a full-on day out there today, a real team effort to keep the boat on its feet and we hit our fastest speed yet which is always good fun. One of those days where you’re glad you can get the boat back to the dock in reasonable shape! We’ve got three key events pretty much back-to-back coming in Aarhus, Saint-Tropez and Cadiz (Andalusia) so it will be very important to get going quickly, get some solid finishes and try to keep ourselves at the top-end of the League.

“The nature of SailGP, the nature of the racing, the quality of the fleet, and with the talent that is in these teams now, it is going to be really hard for one team to stand out and dominate. It’s going to be really tight racing, down to the wire. That’s what we love about SailGP, that intensity of racing, the close battles we are seeing on the water, and expect to see more of that.”

The Great Britain SailGP Team has been joined in Aarhus by Hannah Diamond – the final athlete trialling as part of the league’s Women’s Pathway Program – before a final decision will be made on which of the female athlete trialists will be joining the team full time. With the previous trialists including the likes of recent Olympic medalists Hannah Mills and Anna Burnet, it will be a tough decision to make for Ben Ainslie and the team.

Commenting on SailGP’s Women’s Pathway Program and the team’s trialists Ben Ainslie added: “We can only really accommodate one more full-time sailor with the team so it’s going to be a tough decision how we move forward after this event. We’ve had some great athletes with the team over the past few events, real team players and very talented sailors all of whom have brought brilliant experience, attitude, and personality. We’ll get our heads together after this event and finalise a decision based on what we think will be best for the team”.

Off the water, the Great Britain SailGP Team is also in second place in SailGP’s new Impact League, a world-first integrated second leaderboard created for all eight international teams, where the teams are rewarded for the positive actions they make to reduce their overall carbon footprint and help accelerate inclusivity in sailing. The team has been working closely with its Race For The Future partner STEM Crew to maximise its positive impact and climb up the Impact League leaderboard too.

The ROCKWOOL Denmark Sail Grand Prix is live on Sky Sports from 2PM BST on Friday August 20 and from 12PM BST on Saturday August 21, and is also free to view on SailGP’s YouTube channel. For full viewing details visit sailgp.com/watch.

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COLECCIONISMO: Sotheby’s – WORLD AUCTION RECORD FOR ANY DIAMOND OR JEWEL HIGHEST PRICE FOR ANY WORK SOLD AT AUCTION IN ASIA

THE PINK STAR, ONE OF THE WORLD’S GREAT NATURAL TREASURES

WORLD AUCTION RECORD FOR ANY DIAMOND OR JEWELHIGHEST PRICE FOR ANY WORK SOLD AT AUCTION IN ASIA
LOT SOLD. 553,037,500 HKD (Hammer Price with Buyer’s Premium)

OVERVIEW


CTF Pink Star – A True Masterpiece of Nature

AUCTION RESULTS

On 4 April 2017 in Hong Kong, Sotheby’s set a new world auction record for any diamond or jewel when the Pink Star, a 59.60-carat oval mixed-cut Fancy Vivid Pink Internally Flawless diamond, sold for HK$553 million / US$71.2 million. The Pink Star was acquired by renowned jeweller Chow Tai Fook, with the winning telephone bid placed by Dr. Henry Cheng Kar-Shun, Chairman of the company. The Pink Star has been renamed CTF PINK STAR in memory of the late Dr. Cheng Yu-Tung, father of the current chairman and founder of Chow Tai Fook, and commemorates the esteemed brand’s 88th anniversary.

The CTF PINK STAR, a 59.60-carat oval mixed-cut pink diamond, is the largest Internally Flawless Fancy Vivid Pink diamond that the Gemological Institute of America (GIA) has ever graded. It has received the highest colour and clarity grades from the GIA for pink diamonds and has been found to be part of the rare subgroup comprising less than 2% of all gem diamonds – known as Type IIa: stones in this group are chemically the purest of all diamond crystals and often have extraordinary optical transparency. Mined by De Beers in Africa in 1999, the 132.5-carat rough diamond was meticulously cut and polished over a period of two years and transformed into this stunning gemstone.

PRESS RELEASE

AUCTION DETAILS

Sotheby’s is proud to present the magnificent Pink Star, one of the world’s great natural treasures. The largest Internally Flawless, Fancy Vivid Pink diamond that the GIA has ever graded, this 59.60 carat diamond is a true masterpiece of nature.

CATALOGUE NOTE

Accompanied by GIA report numbered 2175607011, dated 28 April 2016, stating that the diamond is natural, Fancy Vivid Pink Colour, Internally Flawless; together with a diamond type classification report stating that the diamond is determined to be a Type IIa diamond; also accompanied by a letter from GIA stating that this is the largest Flawless or Internally Flawless, Fancy Vivid Pink, Natural Colour, diamond they have ever graded; the GIA report is additionally accompanied by a separate monograph.Further accompanied by a monograph from Gübelin, duplicate no. 16 of the original report numbered 0701199, dated 22 November 2007, stating that the diamond is Fancy Vivid Pink Colour, IF, Type IIa, together with history and chemical analysis of the stone.

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One of the World’s Great Natural Treasures

Meticulously cut by Steinmetz Diamonds over a period of nearly two years – a process in which the 132.50 carat rough was cast in epoxy more than 50 times in order to create models upon which the design team could experiment with different cuts -it was transformed into this spectacular 59.60 carat, fancy vivid pink, internally flawless oval cut gem – the largest internally flawless or flawless, fancy vivid pink diamond that the Gemological Institute of America (GIA) has ever graded.

The diamond was first unveiled to the public in May 2003 as the ‘Steinmetz Pink’, and was modelled by Helena Christensen at a dedicated event thrown to coincide with the Monaco Grand Prix. Writing in the Financial Times on the 31 May 2003, Mike Duff described the diamond as “the rarest, finest, most precious stone the world has ever seen”. The stone was first sold in 2007 and was subsequently renamed “The Pink Star”. In the same article, Tom Moses, Executive Vice President and Chief Laboratory and Research Officer of the GIA, is quoted as saying: “it’s our experience that large polished pink diamonds – over ten carats – very rarely occur with an intense colour… The GIA Laboratory has been issuing grading reports for 50 years and this is the largest pink diamond with this depth of colour [vivid pink] that we have ever characterised”.

Of all fancy coloured pink diamonds, those graded ‘Fancy Vivid’ are the most precious and desirable. The current world auction record for a pink diamond is the Graff Pink, a superb 24.78 carat diamond which sold at Sotheby’s Geneva in November 2010 for US$46.16 million. Weighing in at 59.60 carats and graded as Fancy Vivid, the Pink Star is twice the size.

In the summer of 2003, this amazing gem was exhibited at ‘The Splendor of Diamonds’ exhibition at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington, DC. Displayed in the Winston Gallery alongside the 45.52 carat blue Hope Diamond, the exhibition featured seven of the world’s rarest and most extraordinary diamonds. Also on view for the first time in the United States was the 203.04 carat De Beers Millennium Star, one of the largest diamonds in the world; the Heart of Eternity blue diamond; the Moussaieff Red, the largest known red diamond in the world; the Harry Winston Pumpkin Diamond; the Allnatt, one of the world’s largest yellow diamonds at 101.29 carats; and the Ocean Dream, the world’s largest naturally occurring blue-green diamond.

Commenting at the opening of the exhibition, Dr. Jeffrey Post, curator of the Gems and Minerals Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History said, “Each of the diamonds is the finest of its kind and together with the museum’s gem collection makes for an exhibit of truly historic proportions”. In the three months the exhibition ran, the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History attracted more than 1.6 million visitors.

From July through November 2005, The Pink Star again took centre stage, this time at the ‘Diamonds’ exhibition held at the Natural History Museum, in London. “This exhibition will bring together many of the most impressive single stones in the world, fascinating science, and insights into the diamond industry to tell the story of diamonds from deep in the Earth to the red carpet,” said Michael Dixon, director of the Natural History Museum. For five months, the dazzling exhibition attracted approximately 70,000 visitors a day.