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PETERSEN AUTOMOTIVE MUSEUM – Hypercars The allure of the Extreme

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PETERSEN AUTOMOTIVE MUSEUM 

Hypercars The allure of the Extreme

OPEN NOW THROUGH SEPTEMBER 11, 2022
IN THE BRUCE MEYER FAMILY GALLERY

Supported by: HRE Performance Wheels

// EXHIBITION INCLUDED WITH THE PURCHASE OF A GENERAL ADMISSION TICKET OR WITH YOUR MEMBERSHIP | VEHICLES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE //

EXHIBITION ABSTRACT

Although the term “supercar” first appeared in the 1920s, the modern notion of supercars was born in the late 1960s, when automotive marvels such as the Lamborghini Miura and the Shelby AC Cobra 427, capable of performance targets far exceeding anything that had come before, made their debuts. For the next several decades, the term supercar was applied to a handful of automobiles that occupied the top tier of excellence. And then, inevitably, a car came along that was so extreme—with supernatural performance and outrageous luxury—that it outshone all supercars to date: the Bugatti Veyron of 2005. With its 4-digit horsepower, 7-digit price tag, quad-turbocharged 16-cylinder engine, and top speed greater than 250 miles per hour, the Veyron topped the numeric bar set by earlier supercars, and the “hypercar” was born.

But what exactly is a hypercar? The definition is elusive and debatable. Metrics frequently associated with the hypercar include: excessive top speed, upwards of 200 miles per hour; an abundance of horsepower, approaching or surpassing 1,000; rarity, with less than a few hundred units produced; and a price tag exceeding one million dollars. But none of these things alone, or even combined, definitively make a vehicle a hypercar. There is also an exotic look and a bespoke luxury that can bring the moniker to bear on an automobile. However subjective the definition may be, one thing is for certain: hypercars are all high-performance, highly styled, audacious, alluring, and extreme. This exhibition features a selection of these rarified, ultra-elite vehicles, exploring their manufacture and their capabilities, and hinting at what greatness is still to come.